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In today’s focused session on HCV elimination, clinicians, scientists and programme managers from around the world convened to share research and best practice to help achieve this goal.

As 2030 approaches, each country must evaluate its response to the hepatitis C epidemic. In today’s focused session on HCV elimination, clinicians, scientists and programme managers from around the world convened to share research and best practice to help achieve this goal.

Researchers from Tayside, Scotland, are proposing a new approach to displaying HCV cascades of care that give yearly snapshots of the epidemic and show cumulative progress towards elimination targets. This novel methodology could provide a way to improve national and international reporting and facilitate local service planning and knowledge exchange.

In perhaps one of the most striking success stories, the provision of universal access to testing and treatment for HCV in Spanish prisons has led to a significant decrease in the prevalence of HCV infection, with high screening and treatment rates that are close to WHO recommendations to achieving elimination in this population.

Updates from the country of Georgia show that their national strategy has made substantial progress toward eliminating hepatitis C, with more than half of infected people identified and registered for treatment and very high cure rates (98% SVR12) among those who have received SVR testing. Despite this, challenges remain in identifying and especially linking to care people living with HCV.

In other settings, studies from the UK and Canada demonstrate substantial progress in the uptake of testing and treatment and reducing the incidence of HCV infection in men who have sex with men, while a study from Myanmar has shown that community-based point of care testing and treatment initiated by general practitioners is feasible and effective, with SVR12 rates of 93%, in low/middle-income settings.

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